mom-kissing-newborn-sonMany women feel that after childbirth, or after having experienced a childbirth related illness they are being discriminated against, in both public and in the workplace. However treating a women less favourably because of recent childbirth and any relating illness can amount to discrimination.

One huge example of this is ill-treatment due to breastfeeding, discrimination because of which is still very prominent in society despite all parents being encouraged to do so. However The Equality Act 2010 refers to such ill-treatment as maternity discrimination, and this act protects you for 26 days after you give birth, after which any discrimination, such as being treated less favourably due to breast feeding, them will amount to sex discrimination.

Actions that could be seen as less favourable treatment include not being served, being asked to stop or cover up, or in some cases being asked to leave the premises. In a workplace this could include not being offered a job or promotion due to your recent childbirth.

If this does happen you could take action in the civil courts or employment tribunal.

There are no laws against breast feeding in public, as previously mentioned it is encouraged as the most nutritious option for your child, and employers, public bodies, businesses and service providers are required to allow you to breastfeed your baby on their premises without complaint. This applies unless doing so would rise a health and safety concern, in such cases exceptions are made

If you feel like you have been the victim of maternal discrimination, may it be by and employer, public body, business or service provider because you were breastfeeding, please know that you may be able to do something about it, such as take action in the Civil courts or Employment Tribunal.

Do not be afraid to take action if you feel discriminated against.